ePoster #749 - ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting 2016

Prevalence Of And Risk Factors For Subspinal Impingement In Symptomatic Patients

Yong-Chan Ha, MD, PhD, Seoul SOUTH KOREA
Jun-Il Yoo, MD, Seoul KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul, KOREA, REPUBLIC OF

FDA Status Cleared

Summary: Subspinal impingement is an important risk factor for hip pain in young male patients complaining of mechanical symptoms.

Abstract:
Background: Subspinal impingement is well known as a representative extra-articular type of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). However, studies regarding the prevalence and risk factors of subspinal impinement (SSI) are still not numerous enough and are limited to reports of radiographic and clinical findings. This study aimed to determine: (1) The prevalence of SSI in both symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals; (2) morphologic characteristics in symptomatic patients; and (3) risk factors for SSI. Methods: The study cohort consisted of 427 patients (427 hips; mean patient age, 33.4 years; range, 19-50 years) with mechanical symptoms who underwent multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) arthrography (symptomatic patients), and an age-, site- (left or right hip), and time- (at diagnosis) matched control group (asymptomatic patients) that underwent abdominopelvic three-demensional CT or plain radiography using pelvic anteroposterior and hip lateral views because of a ureter stone or minor trauma. Two orthopedic surgeons reviewed the images to evaluate the prevalence of SSI and the relationship with morphologic abnormalities. Results: The prevalence of SSI in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients was 15.2% (65/427) and 16.9% (262/1547), respectively (p=0.399). Structural bony abnormalities in symptomatic patients were not associated with the presence of SSI (p=0.188). Conclusions: SSI had a similar prevalence in symptomatic and asymptomatic patients and was not rare in either group. However, it was an important risk factor for hip pain in young male patients complaining of mechanical symptoms.