ePoster #1107 - ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting 2016

Incidence and Complications of Open Hip Preservation Surgery: An American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Database Review

Jon Hedgecock, MD, Rochester UNITED STATES
Christopher Cook, MD, Rochester, NY UNITED STATES
John Harrast, MS, Hinsdale, IL UNITED STATES
Judith Baumhauer, MD, Rochester UNITED STATES
Brian D. Giordano, MD, Rochester, NY UNITED STATES

University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, UNITED STATES

FDA Status Not Applicable

Summary: The purpose of this study is to investigate the trends and complications of open hip preservation surgery performed by candidates undergoing Part II of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) examination.

Abstract:
Hip preservation surgery (HPS) encompasses various surgical procedures that have the shared goal of decreasing the progression of osteoarthritis, preserving normal hip function, and delaying the need for arthroplasty. These can encompass arthroscopic, open, and combined techniques. The purpose of this study is to investigate the trends and complications of open hip preservation surgery performed by candidates undergoing Part II of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) examination. The ABOS Part II surgeon case database was queried from the years 2003-2013 for open HPS related CPT codes in patients age 10 and older. Patient demographics, fellowship training, geographic location, and complications were extracted from the database. These data were analyzed to determine the incidence by year of individual procedures and complications. During the study period, 644 cases (352 male, 292 female, mean age 29.7) and 730 CPT codes were reported. The most commonly reported fellowship was pediatric orthopaedics. There was no trend observed in the overall incidence of these surgeries, but there was an increase in the number of cases performed in the Midwest. There were 212 reported complications, with a rate of 33% per case or 29% per CPT code (range 12.5 to 100% per CPT code). Complications reported ranged from infection to death. Incidence of complications over time showed no discernible trend. Based on the results of this study, the yearly incidence and complications of open HPS performed by surgeons undergoing board certification should continue at a predictable rate.